The Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi (NHBP) announced on Monday, last year’s revenue sharing payments to the State of Michigan and the FireKeepers Local Revenue Sharing Board (FLRSB) from its FireKeepers Casino Hotel of more than $23.7 million, its third consecutive new annual record.

According to the press release (pdf), of the $23.7 million, upwards of $18.1 million went to the State of Michigan, an increase of 5.84 percent over last year’s payment, while more than $5.6 million went to the FLRSB, a 4.62 percent spike from a year ago.

Last year’s revenue sharing payments brings the total amount contributed by the NHBP to the State of Michigan to more than $125.2 million and to the FLRSB, $43.2 million, creating a combined contribution total of $168,473,743 since Aug. 2009 when Firekeepers Casino Hotel debuted.

The NHBP on Monday presented two checks, the first to State Senator Michael Nofs for $18,126,750. Nofs’ 19th District spans Ionia, Calhoun and Berry counties. Newly-appointed FLRSB Chairman and Chairman of the Calhoun County Board of Commissioners Derek King, was presented with the second check, which was for $5,656,690.

The finds are distributed as part of a gaming compact between the state and NHBP for 2017 operations at the Tribe’s Battle Creek, Michigan-located FireKeepers Casino Hotel.

In the press release, Chairman Jamie Stuck, said, “The leadership and tribal members of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi are proud to honor our agreements and create a positive impact to the State of Michigan and our Local Revenue Sharing Board and we are pleased with the growth displayed at FireKeepers Casino Hotel.”

“The great performance of our FireKeepers team has created new jobs in 2017 and a destination resort that attracts guests from across Michigan plus large sections of Indiana, Ohio and Illinois. The creation of great guest experiences creates a loyal factor that has been the foundation of our substantial revenue growth to support needs in our local communities,” Stuck added.

The terms of a 2016 amendment to the Class III gaming compact between NHBP and the state provides for as much as $500,000 annually of state revenue payments to go to the Michigan Native American Heritage Fund. Monies from the fund provide grants for educational institutions and local governments, as well as to promote tribal culture and history.

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